Testosterone Treatment and Heart Attack Risk

- New study shows testosterone treatment can even be beneficial

Testosterone Treatment and Heart Attack Risk

Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Older Men Receiving Testosterone Therapy. Baillargeon, J., et al., Ann Pharmacother 1060028014539918, first published on July 2, 2014 as doi:10.1177/1060028014539918, 2014

Testosterone therapy has been in use for more than 70 years for the treatment of hypogonadism, also called testosterone deficiency.1 In the past 30 years there has been a growing body of scientific research demonstrating that testosterone deficiency is associated with increased body weight/adiposity/waist circumference, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, erectile dysfunction (ED) and increased risk of mortality.2, 3 In line with the detrimental health outcomes seen with testosterone deficiency, testosterone therapy has been shown to confer beneficial effects on multiple risk factors and risk biomarkers related to these clinical conditions.4

Despite these well-documented health benefits, testosterone therapy is still controversial, in large part due to a few flawed studies about potential elevated heart attack risk with testosterone therapy. On July 2, 2014, a study was published which demonstrated that testosterone therapy is not associated with an increased risk of heart attack, and may actually confer protection against heart attack.5

Testosterone Treatment and Heart Attack Risk

  • Testosterone deficiency is associated with increased body weight/adiposity/waist circumference, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, erectile dysfunction (ED) and increased risk of mortality.2
  • Testosterone therapy beneficially impacts multiple risk factors and risk biomarkers related to highly prevalent clinical conditions that are associated with testosterone deficiency.4
  • The most recent study reported in this editorial demonstrates that testosterone therapy does not increase risk of MI, and that it actually may protect against MI in high-risk population.5 This is in line with a large body of research showing beneficial effects of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal men.4
  • Three large meta-analyses specifically focusing on identifying potential adverse effects of testosterone treatment report no significant increases in cardiovascular risk.6-8
  • A review of all testosterone trials up to 2012 found that testosterone therapy in patients with preexisting cardiovascular conditions, the effect on disease markers has typically been either neutral or beneficial, and does not increase the incidence of cardiovascular events.9

What is known

To the contrary of the large body of evidence supporting beneficial health effects of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal men, two recent studies reported that testosterone therapy is associated with an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and death.10, 11 The first study, published on November 6, 2013, used a complicated questionable new statistical approach which reversed the actual results demonstrating a benefit for men treated with testosterone.11 This study has undergone two corrections, with such large data errors that 29 medical societies have called for retraction of the study as it is “no longer credible”.12, 13

The second study, published on January 29, 2014, was a retrospective study of a health insurance database that reported rates of non-fatal myocardial infarction in up to 90 days following a testosterone prescription, and compared this to MI rates in the prior 12 months. The authors reported the rate ratio of heart attack post-prescription to pre-prescription was 1.36, and the rate in men older than 65 years was 2.19.10 However, the investigators presented the pre-prescription heart attack rate as if it reflected the natural history of heart attacks in the study population prior to treatment. This was not the case, because there was no run-in period to determine the natural history of untreated T deficiency. The study group was selected on the basis of having already received a T prescription. This means the pre-prescription heart attack rate reflects how often healthcare providers were willing to prescribe T to men with a recent (within 12 mo) heart attack. Any reluctance to prescribe T to men with recent heart attack would result in a reduced pre-prescription heart attack rate. Thus, the study substituted physician prescribing patterns for naturally occurring heart attack rates. This is a serious methodological error. Unacknowledged by the authors, observed heart attack rates after T prescription were actually substantially lower than predicted by the National Institutes of Health Heart Attack Risk Calculator.14

These two studies received widespread media attention, and created a new concern regarding cardiovascular risks with T prescriptions, with little attention paid to the critical methodological flaws in these studies, nor the large number of prior studies showing beneficial cardiovascular effects of testosterone therapy.

What this study adds

The latest study on testosterone therapy and heart attack, published July 2, 2014, examined the risk of heart attack in a population-based cohort of older men receiving intramuscular testosterone.5

In a sample of 25,420 US Medicare recipients aged 65 y and older, a group of 6355 men treated with at least 1 injection of testosterone between January 1, 1997, and December 31, 2005 were matched to testosterone non-users. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, receipt of testosterone therapy was not associated with an increased risk of heart attack.

Interestingly, a significant trend towards reduced MI rates with T administration was noted with increasing quartiles of risk. For men in the highest prognostic heart attack risk, treatment with testosterone therapy was associated with significantly reduced risk of heart attack. A dose-response analysis demonstrated no increased risk in heart attack according to estimated cumulative dose of testosterone. In contrast the first negative study mentioned above, this latest study adhered to well-established methodology and statistical analysis.

The study concluded that older men who were treated with intramuscular testosterone do not appear to have an increased risk of heart attack. For men with high heart attack risk, testosterone use is actually protective against heart attack. This conclusion is in line with previous studies showing that testosterone treatment in men over 40 years of age is associated with decreased mortality compared with no testosterone treatment.16, 17

These results are also consistent with three large meta-analyses that specifically focused on identifying potential adverse effects of testosterone treatment, and reported no significant increases in cardiovascular risks.6-8 A more recent review of testosterone trials found that testosterone therapy in patients with preexisting cardiovascular conditions, the effect on disease markers has typically been either neutral or beneficial, and does not increase the incidence of cardiovascular events.9

An insightful quote from the paper "Testosterone and cardiovascular risk: world’s experts take unprecedented action to correct misinformation" elegantly illustrates the scientific reality:13 "Science is complex, and there will always be articles published that yield unexpected or awkward results. Every once in a while, though, it is important for the research and clinical medical community to stand up and say, ‘‘No! This is wrong!’’ We do this for science, for the integrity of medical literature, and most importantly, we do it for the health and welfare of our patients."

References

1. Nieschlag E, Nieschlag S. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective. Asian journal of andrology. 2014;16(2):161-168.
2. Traish AM. Adverse health effects of testosterone deficiency (TD) in men. Steroids. 2014.
3. Mesbah Oskui P, French WJ, Herring MJ, et al. Testosterone and the cardiovascular system: a comprehensive review of the clinical literature. Journal of the American Heart Association. 2013;2(6):e000272.
4. Traish AM. Outcomes of testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency (TD): Part II. Steroids. 2014, published online May 24, 2014.
5. Baillargeon J, Urban RJ, Kuo Y-F, et al. Risk of Myocardial Infarction in Older Men Receiving Testosterone Therapy. Ann Pharmacother 1060028014539918, first published on July 2, 2014 as doi:101177/1060028014539918. 2014.
6. Calof OM, Singh AB, Lee ML, et al. Adverse events associated with testosterone replacement in middle-aged and older men: a meta-analysis of randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The journals of gerontology Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences. 2005;60(11):1451-1457.
7. Fernandez-Balsells MM, Murad MH, Lane M, et al. Clinical review 1: Adverse effects of testosterone therapy in adult men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. 2010;95(6):2560-2575.
8. Haddad RM, Kennedy CC, Caples SM, et al. Testosterone and cardiovascular risk in men: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Mayo Clinic proceedings Mayo Clinic. 2007;82(1):29-39.
9. Carson CC, 3rd, Rosano G. Exogenous testosterone, cardiovascular events, and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly men: a review of trial data. The journal of sexual medicine. 2012;9(1):54-67.
10. Finkle WD, Greenland S, Ridgeway GK, et al. Increased risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction following testosterone therapy prescription in men. PloS one. 2014;9(1):e85805.
11. Vigen R, O'Donnell CI, Baron AE, et al. Association of testosterone therapy with mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in men with low testosterone levels. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association. 2013;310(17):1829-1836.
12. Morgentaler A. Letter to JAMA Asking for Retraction of Misleading Article on Testosterone Therapy. Availible at http://www.androgenstudygroup.org/initiatives/letter-to-jama-asking-for-retraction-of-misleading-article-on-testosterone-therapy, accessed July 2, 2014. Androgen Study Group (ASG) 2014.
13. Morgentaler A, Lunenfeld B. Testosterone and cardiovascular risk: world's experts take unprecedented action to correct misinformation. The aging male : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of the Aging Male. 2014;17(2):63-65.
14. NIH. Risk Assessment Tool for Estimating Your 10-year Risk of Having a Heart Attack. http://cvdrisknhlbinihgov/calculatorasp, accessed April 21, 2014.
15. Morgentaler A. Testosterone, cardiovascular risk, and hormonophobia. The journal of sexual medicine. 2014;11(6):1362-1366.
16. Shores MM, Smith NL, Forsberg CW, et al. Testosterone treatment and mortality in men with low testosterone levels. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism. 2012;97(6):2050-2058.
17. Muraleedharan V, Marsh H, Kapoor D, et al. Testosterone deficiency is associated with increased risk of mortality and testosterone replacement improves survival in men with type 2 diabetes. European journal of endocrinology / European Federation of Endocrine Societies. 2013;169(6):725-733.
Last updated: 2017
G.GM.MH.04.2015.0334